City of Brotherly Love and City of Food: Philadelphia, USA

Few cities and dishes lay claim to one another in the way that Philadelphia and the cheesesteak do. But don’t think that because it shares a special connection with a sandwich stuffed with steak smothered in cheese that Philly’s a one-dish wonder.

Alongside all the world-class fine-dining restaurants, quaint bistros and friendly cafes you’d expect of a big city, Philadelphia’s got a thriving foodie scene.

Here are a few spots to get your eat on in the City of Brotherly Love.

Guapos tacos food truck by Iron Chef Jose Garces

Guapos tacos food truck by Iron Chef Jose Garces, Philadelphia. Photo by katerha

Food Trucks are a phenomenon that has really taken a hold of Philly. Even former Iron Chef Jose Garces runs one in the city. The website chowspotter.com keeps tabs on the schedules of more than 50 trucks, showing where and when you can locate them.

Night Markets  are one of the best ways to experience Philadelphia’s food truck scene. Essentially, on selected nights of the year a number of trucks park in predetermined locations, creating a kind of street food circus. Check the website for times and locations.

Reading Terminal Market, Philadelphia

Reading Terminal Market, Philadelphia. Photo by USDAgov

Philadelphia’s historic markets are another great way to explore its culinary cool. Reading Terminal Market has been supplying the city with local fresh produce for 120 years. The 1.7 acres of indoor bazaar are home to more than 80 vendors selling tons of goodies, such as fresh juices, meats, seafood, vegetables and fruit. Interestingly, you can find a few goods farmed and made by the nearby Amish community.

9th Street Italian Market, Philadelphia

9th Street Italian Market. Photo by amy.gizienski

A good alternative is 9th Street Italian Market . Dating back to the 1880s, this was formerly a traditional market of the likes of Reading Terminal. Today, its Mexican and Asian offerings are a reflection of the city’s increasingly diverse communities.

Yuengling beer, Philadelphia

Stanley Clockwork’s beer bottle clock made out of Yuengling beer bottles in the hall on the way to Terminal A, Philadelphia International Airport. Photo by waitscm

In 1840, Philadelphia’s John Wagner became the first person to brew beer in the States. Since then, brewing has always remained close to Philly’s heart. Nowadays the city’s home to dozens of microbreweries and major national brands such as Yuengling, Yards and Triumph, all of which are enjoyed in the 400 bars found throughout the city.

One of the best is McGillin’s Olde Ale House. The beer taps have been flowing here since 1860, making it the oldest continuously operating tavern in Philadelphia and one of the oldest taverns in the country.

Written by insider city guide series Hg2 | A Hedonist’s guide to…

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