Guide to Japan’s Hot Springs

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When people think of natural hot springs they think of Iceland: more fool them. They neglect to remember that Japan is a hotbed of onsen, and has more than 3000 in total, spread up and down the country. Their paradisal locations include tropical rainforests and clifftop crags, each bubbling with mineral-infused water and rejuvenating steams. Follow our guide to Japan’s best hot springs that will help you relax, unwind, and enjoy.

Uramigataki Onsen, Hachijojima, Izushoto

The best thing about this semi-tropical rainforest onsen is the once-in-a-lifetime experience of bathing in the jungle. The second best thing is that it’s free. Slip into one of the warm rock pools bordered with luscious greenery and consider how much people pay for a replica spa experience in Bali. And try not to feel too smug about it.

Uramigataki Onsen © hirohiro akabane/flickr
Uramigataki Onsen © hirohiro akabane/flickr

Kinosaki, Kansai

Once you’ve caught onsen fever, there’s no going back. Quench your insatiable thirst for more hot springs in the resort of Kinosaki, where you can onsen-hop to your heart’s content. Each of the seven famous springs dotted around the town promises unique benefits from their waters – happiness in marriage, prosperity in business, and good luck in childbirth, to name but a few.

Kinosaki © Michael Vito/flickr
Kinosaki © Michael Vito/flickr

Takegawara Onsen, Beppu, Kyushu

For a more traditional Japanese experience, head straight for the famous Takegawara Onsen in Beppu. Housed within an old picturesque wooden structure, this straightforward spa offers two treatments options: spring bath (go right) or sand bath (go left). Almost everyone goes left – if only for the novelty of being buried alive in hot sand, which is strangely cathartic.

Takegawara Onsen © the.Firebottle/flickr
Takegawara Onsen © the.Firebottle/flickr

Takaragawa Onsen, Gunma, Central Honshu

Not to be confused with the above onsen of similar name (although you wouldn’t do badly to end up at either), the Takaragawa Onsen is reputedly the best in Japan. Pilgrims travel from far and wide to this idyllic riverside setting to rest their weary limbs in the various outdoor and indoor baths imbued with healing waters.

Takaragawa Onsen © Noriko Puffy/flickr
Takaragawa Onsen © Noriko Puffy/flickr

Shirahama, Wakayama, Kansai

Those with a penchant for bathing will love the onsen experience at Shirahama, where the open-air hot spring bath lies just meters from the shore. Hot? Cold? Alternate between a relaxing soak in the warm waters of Sakino-yu (admission 300 yen), and the refreshing pinch of the great Pacific Ocean.

Shirahama © Holger Mette/iStock/Thinkstock
Shirahama © Holger Mette/iStock/Thinkstock

Featured image © Ryan McVay/iStock/Thinkstock

Written by insider city guide series Hg2 | A Hedonist’s guide to… whose guides cover all the best hotels, restaurants, bars, clubs, sights, shops and spas.

Guide to Japan’s Hot Springs was last modified: June 26th, 2019 by Elizabeth Gourd
Author: Elizabeth Gourd (78 posts)

Elizabeth suffers from an acute case of wanderlust, which no amount of traveling or adventure can cure. She has lived in London, New York and Berlin, and is currently a writer for Hg2 | A Hedonist's Guide To...