4 seriously remote getaways

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A place that’s detached from the outside world, away from mobiles, computers, television and crowds of people. Somewhere like…

When you need to put some real distance between yourself and your woes, travelling to the typical, everyday destination simply won’t do. You need somewhere seriously remote. A place that’s detached from the outside world, away from mobiles, computers, television and crowds of people. Somewhere like Tristan da Cunha (pic by brian.gratwicke) …

A ship off the coast of Barrow, Alaska
A ship off the coast of Barrow, Alaska. Photo by EOL Learning and Education Group
Welcome to Barrow, Alaska
Welcome to Barrow, Alaska. The sign is flanked by whale jawbones. Photo by alaskaman1
Barrow, Alaska
Barrow – it’s a long way from everywhere. Photo by MarmotChaser
The midnight sun in Barrow, Alaska
The midnight sun in Barrow, Alaska. Photo by MarmotChaser

BarrowAlaska

Barrow is the northernmost city in the United States and the ninth northernmost in the world. But that’s not its only claim to fame.

For more than two-and-a-half months each year (May to August) the sun doesn’t set here. That’s the good news. The bad news is that outside of June-September temperatures don’t reach beyond -5.7 C (21.8 F), and at their worst they drop to -28.6 C (-19.5 F).

Thankfully, local accommodation of choice King Eider Inn has a steamy sauna and a snug fireplace that keeps visitors toasty.

The flag of Tristan da Cunha features crayfish (rock lobsters)
The flag of Tristan da Cunha features crayfish (rock lobsters). Photo by brian.gratwicke
The main settlement on Tristan da Cunha
The main settlement on Tristan da Cunha. Photo by the Official CTBTO Photostream
A stained glass window in St. Joseph's Catholic Church, Tristan da Cunha
A stained glass window in St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, Tristan da Cunha. Photo by brian.gratwicke

Edinburgh of the Seven Seas – Tristan da Cunha

If you want a place that’s as disconnected as Hawaii was 200 years ago, you’ll need to head to the single most remote inhabited place in the world – Tristan de Cunha.

The largest island of southern Atlantic Ocean archipelago of the same name, it lies roughly 1,700 miles southwest of its nearest landfall, South Africa.

Edinburgh of the Seven Seas, home to roughly 250 people, is the main settlement on the island is (its name a reflection of its UK sovereignty).

The only way to Tristan da Cunha is to hitch a ride on a deep-sea fishing boat or cargo vessel. On approach, the island’s volcanic profile is simply staggering – you’ll quickly see why it hasn’t been possible to build an airstrip.

Supai, Arizona, USA
Havasupai means “People-of-the-Blue-Green-Waters”. Photo by aaronperkins
A shop at the edge of Supai Village, Arizona
A shop at the edge of Supai Village. Photo by runnr_az
Members of the Havasupai Tribe
Members of the Havasupai Tribe perform a traditional dance at the Landmark and Tribal Medallion near Mather Point in 2011. Photo by Grand Canyon NPS

SupaiArizona

To find that elusive spot that has the rare combination of inaccessibility and proximity to civilisation, you need to seek out a pretty spectacular landscape, namely the Grand Canyon.

Deep within its rim, beside a tributary on the south side of the Colorado River, lies the village of Supai. This quaint ranch-style town of around 500 people is the seat of government for the Havasupai Native American tribe.

There are no roads here. Visitors have to come in the same way as the mail does – on foot or on a mule.

Ittoqqortoormiit, East Greenland
Ittoqqortoormiit, East Greenland. Photo by ilovegreenland
Ittoqqortoormiit, East Greenland
Ittoqqortoormiit. Photo by Johan615
Ittoqqortoormiit, East Greenland
Photo by ilovegreenland
Ittoqqortoormiit, East Greenland. Photo by ilovegreenland
Photo by ilovegreenland

Ittoqqortoormiit – East Greenland

Greenland is the world’s largest island, yet it has a population of fewer than 60,000 people. And no wonder – large swathes of its territory are essentially desolate.

The 500 or so inhabitants of the small outpost of Ittoqqortoormiit (try pronouncing that!) know all about desolation.

The village on the far eastern coast of the territory is surrounded by uninhabited lands the size of England on one side, and by perpetually frozen seas on the other (it’s almost as far north as Barrow).

They survive by fishing for halibut during the three months of summer when the ice isn’t frozen, and hunting polar bears and whales.

Written by insider city guide series Hg2 | A Hedonist’s guide to…

4 seriously remote getaways was last modified: June 26th, 2019 by Brett Ackroyd
Author: Brett Ackroyd (631 posts)

Brett hopes to one day reach the shores of far-flung Tristan da Cunha, the most remote of all the inhabited archipelagos on Earth…as to what he’ll do when he gets there, he hasn’t a clue. Over the last 10 years, London, New York, Cape Town and Pondicherry have all proudly been referred to as home. Now it’s Copenhagen’s turn, where he lends his travel expertise to momondo.com.